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The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
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gework Offline
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 11:54 AM)John Michael Kane Wrote:  
Quote:Cheesecake Factory Refuses To Pay Rent, Cites "Tremendous Financial Blow"

The most obese Americans love places like Cheesecake Factory.

[Image: Screenshot-at-2020-03-26-19-11-59.png]

All over the world the sewage system is under strain from toilet roll substitutes being flushed down them. Dante's inferno awaits.

(03-26-2020 12:40 PM)swuglyfe Wrote:  I suppose having as much of my net worth on hand in 'hard currency'

It's what I'm going with. In terms of prepping your pretty good with food and water.

With a downwards trajectory a bit steeper than 2008 I think it's looking like this, bottoming in mid 2021. The wildcard is the amount of stimulus they may try.

[Image: Screenshot-at-2020-03-26-19-24-45.png]

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03-26-2020 02:27 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
With hyperinflation (and maybe bank bail-ins) being a threat, would it be a good idea to liquidate one's cash into physical assets - like a house? A big gamble at this point that I probably wouldn't do, but would like to get your thoughts on. Of course that can get confiscated too. An offshore account in a different currency is just something that's not realistic for most average Joes here, unless someone here knows something that I don't.
03-26-2020 03:24 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 03:24 PM)kamoz Wrote:  With hyperinflation (and maybe bank bail-ins) being a threat, would it be a good idea to liquidate one's cash into physical assets - like a house? A big gamble at this point that I probably wouldn't do, but would like to get your thoughts on. Of course that can get confiscated too. An offshore account in a different currency is just something that's not realistic for most average Joes here, unless someone here knows something that I don't.

Maybe. It is highly dependent upon your local market. If you are outside of a major metro area and you can find an extremely motivated seller, there will rarely be a better time to buy. The pandemic panic will drive prices down and sellers into making more emotional selling choices, especially if they are hard up for cash and are afraid of losing the home to the bank.

Your low-ball bid may just close the deal. You have nothing to lose by low balling. You'll likely get several rejections, but you only need to find one motivated seller and one property that suits your needs. Given the effort, odds are in your favor.

Mortgage rates will likely never be lower either, and if you can prove the income, now would be the time to secure it before the credit market tightens up even more.

An ideal home would be one with an unfinished basement, granny unit, an attic or detached building that you could rent out, greatly reducing your net cost to own the property. While it is good to secure a place for yourself to live instead of getting stuck in the rent trap, you have to ask yourself how badly you wish to live in a particular area for the long-term. What are the work prospects there? If you are going to live off the land, what's the weather like and growing season? How many vibrants are nearby? What are the local laws and how would they affect your way of life?

Ponder these things carefully, and if you find that motivated seller, consider buying. Just don't offer market price, because the pain has yet to fully set in, so you don't want to price yourself ahead of the curve.

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03-26-2020 03:31 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 03:31 PM)John Michael Kane Wrote:  
(03-26-2020 03:24 PM)kamoz Wrote:  With hyperinflation (and maybe bank bail-ins) being a threat, would it be a good idea to liquidate one's cash into physical assets - like a house? A big gamble at this point that I probably wouldn't do, but would like to get your thoughts on. Of course that can get confiscated too. An offshore account in a different currency is just something that's not realistic for most average Joes here, unless someone here knows something that I don't.

Maybe. It is highly dependent upon your local market. If you are outside of a major metro area and you can find an extremely motivated seller, there will rarely be a better time to buy. The pandemic panic will drive prices down and sellers into making more emotional selling choices, especially if they are hard up for cash and are afraid of losing the home to the bank.

Your low-ball bid may just close the deal. You have nothing to lose by low balling. You'll likely get several rejections, but you only need to find one motivated seller and one property that suits your needs. Given the effort, odds are in your favor.

Mortgage rates will likely never be lower either, and if you can prove the income, now would be the time to secure it before the credit market tightens up even more.

An ideal home would be one with an unfinished basement, granny unit, an attic or detached building that you could rent out, greatly reducing your net cost to own the property. While it is good to secure a place for yourself to live instead of getting stuck in the rent trap, you have to ask yourself how badly you wish to live in a particular area for the long-term. What are the work prospects there? If you are going to live off the land, what's the weather like and growing season? How many vibrants are nearby? What are the local laws and how would they affect your way of life?

Ponder these things carefully, and if you find that motivated seller, consider buying. Just don't offer market price, because the pain has yet to fully set in, so you don't want to price yourself ahead of the curve.

John, the strategy you just described is almost exactly what I am planning assuming “normal” life lies ahead for the foreseeable future. I think over the next few months and year house prices will go incredibly low and mortgage rates will still be extremely low (less than 3% now!).

However my post above is assuming a Greek, Cyprus, or even worse, situation. How likely do you think this is and would that change your strategy? My thoughts on that post are - should I hurry up and dump my cash into a physical asset like a house before my money is worthless?
03-26-2020 03:43 PM
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Tail Gunner Offline
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
You guys are really really really overdoing the whole hyperinflation bugaboo. The simple fact is that during the last century less than a handful of first-world countries ever experienced hyperinflation (e.g., post-WWI Germany and Austria; post-WWII Hungary). And all those first-world nations lost world wars. The fact is that hyperinflation is primarily a third-world problem. Stagflation, which is far more likely in the U.S. and Europe, is bad, but nothing akin to hyperinflation.

http://www.munknee.com/21-countries-have...-u-s-next/

Hyperinflation has very specific pre-conditions in foreign currency obligations and a loss of tax revenue and productive resources. Printing money alone does not result in hyperinflation. In fact, in 2008, we did not even experience high inflation, much less hyperinflation. As such, it is not credible to claim that hyperinflation in the U.S. will occur now or anytime in the immediate future.

BTW: It is well-worth holding precious metals during stagflation, so nothing changes there.
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 03:53 PM by Tail Gunner.)
03-26-2020 03:50 PM
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Caractacus Potts Offline
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 03:24 PM)kamoz Wrote:  With hyperinflation (and maybe bank bail-ins) being a threat, would it be a good idea to liquidate one's cash into physical assets - like a house? A big gamble at this point that I probably wouldn't do, but would like to get your thoughts on. Of course that can get confiscated too. An offshore account in a different currency is just something that's not realistic for most average Joes here, unless someone here knows something that I don't.

The book SlickyBoy has referred to is John T. Reed's "Hyperinflation and Depression." I bought it several years ago and am rereading it now. If you can 't buy foreign currencies and secret them away in banks in Canada and Switzerland the next best thing to do with rapidly depreciating currencies is to buy everything you will need for the rest of your life.

"What is that?" you wonder? Soap, deodorant, toothpaste, laundry detergent, toilet paper, paper towels, etc. Things you will use whether the Dow is at 3,000 or 30,000. Unfortunately the FED has made speculators of us all. According to the book Reed feels that the longest that things will drag out is two years. If you can make it that long in an uncertain environment you will probably be okay. I will post more after I have finished rereading the book.

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03-26-2020 03:57 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 02:27 PM)gework Wrote:  With a downwards trajectory a bit steeper than 2008 I think it's looking like this, bottoming in mid 2021. The wildcard is the amount of stimulus they may try.

[Image: Screenshot-at-2020-03-26-19-24-45.png]

This is the S&P, correct? I would be interested in hearing your general thesis about why you believe that this is the most likely scenario. Is this based on the analysis of a financial analyst who you follow? Thanks.
03-26-2020 04:02 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 03:43 PM)kamoz Wrote:  
(03-26-2020 03:31 PM)John Michael Kane Wrote:  
(03-26-2020 03:24 PM)kamoz Wrote:  With hyperinflation (and maybe bank bail-ins) being a threat, would it be a good idea to liquidate one's cash into physical assets - like a house? A big gamble at this point that I probably wouldn't do, but would like to get your thoughts on. Of course that can get confiscated too. An offshore account in a different currency is just something that's not realistic for most average Joes here, unless someone here knows something that I don't.

Maybe. It is highly dependent upon your local market. If you are outside of a major metro area and you can find an extremely motivated seller, there will rarely be a better time to buy. The pandemic panic will drive prices down and sellers into making more emotional selling choices, especially if they are hard up for cash and are afraid of losing the home to the bank.

Your low-ball bid may just close the deal. You have nothing to lose by low balling. You'll likely get several rejections, but you only need to find one motivated seller and one property that suits your needs. Given the effort, odds are in your favor.

Mortgage rates will likely never be lower either, and if you can prove the income, now would be the time to secure it before the credit market tightens up even more.

An ideal home would be one with an unfinished basement, granny unit, an attic or detached building that you could rent out, greatly reducing your net cost to own the property. While it is good to secure a place for yourself to live instead of getting stuck in the rent trap, you have to ask yourself how badly you wish to live in a particular area for the long-term. What are the work prospects there? If you are going to live off the land, what's the weather like and growing season? How many vibrants are nearby? What are the local laws and how would they affect your way of life?

Ponder these things carefully, and if you find that motivated seller, consider buying. Just don't offer market price, because the pain has yet to fully set in, so you don't want to price yourself ahead of the curve.

John, the strategy you just described is almost exactly what I am planning assuming “normal” life lies ahead for the foreseeable future. I think over the next few months and year house prices will go incredibly low and mortgage rates will still be extremely low (less than 3% now!).

However my post above is assuming a Greek, Cyprus, or even worse, situation. How likely do you think this is and would that change your strategy? My thoughts on that post are - should I hurry up and dump my cash into a physical asset like a house before my money is worthless?

I do not believe we'll head to Greek or Cyprus levels in the United States for at least a few years. As badly as the economy has taken a beating, we still have a diversified one, with one of the world's most powerful militaries backing it. Also, other countries that are heavily invested in United States debt don't want the bubble to pop too badly either, otherwise they'll be holding worthless notes. My take on it is that all developed sovereign nations will continue to spend until oblivion for years to come. Nobody wants to blink, and it might take an actual world war to see a massive realignment and destruction of a currency.

If anything, I suspect that a lot of nationalist parties in Europe will rebuke the open-borders EU crowd for this whole virus mess. It wouldn't surprise me if the civil conflict comes to Europe sooner rather than later. Things are a tinder box, it wouldn't take much to spark it. If that happens, goodbye EU and goodbye Euro with it. As crazy as the money printing is going in the United States, there are other systemic problems that are worse elsewhere. You can't go wrong with securing some real estate in a more remote part of the country and planning on living off the land. Better to start now than when the poop really hits the fan. Lifestyle adjustment happens best slowly and at a pace you can adjust to.

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03-26-2020 04:12 PM
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gework Offline
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
Last recession saw the average house price drop 25% in the US, but the window is small. Some data here, by country: https://www.globalpropertyguide.com/Euro...ice-Trends

The chart is:

[Image: Screenshot-at-2020-03-26-21-32-14.png]

*) Establish long-term bear support (low wicks) and bull ceiling (high wicks)
*) For each bull market establish the bear support (low wicks) and you have to predict the downside from your sentiment

It's not good for predicting the tops. I don't think there is much you can get from charts for that. But it's fairly good at pin pointing the buy point in broad, cyclical markets, i.e. not individual stocks or small more unpredictable markets like Ukraine. But if the market goes considerably above the support (low wicks) line and then comes back through it, then it looks like a sell. The buy is easier - if it hits the long-term support or when the downside crosses with the projected trajectory of the next bull market.

I put on a line predicting the low wicks (support) of the current bear market based on the sentiment this down cycle will be faster than '08, owing to what has been discussed here. It's pinged off that and I think it will consolidate and hang around $2,750 with the stimulus and large fund buying back in.

The green line is a prediction based on the high wicks of the last two bear markets.

Though The Fed and government are hyper-alert as to any weaknesses. They are ready to throw in money as needed, which could change things. But for some time I've thought that the coming crisis is going to be cross-border. It's been too obvious for a few years that The Fed is ready to stimulate at short notice and they are vigilant for weaknesses. But they can't bail out the trillions in non-US USD denominated debt. And those countries can't bail themselves out either. That it where I have always seen the crisis emerging, likely China.

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03-26-2020 05:07 PM
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Post: #410
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 03:50 PM)Tail Gunner Wrote:  The fact is that hyperinflation is primarily a third-world problem.

http://www.munknee.com/21-countries-have...-u-s-next/

Hyperinflation has very specific pre-conditions in foreign currency obligations and a loss of tax revenue and productive resources. Printing money alone does not result in hyperinflation. In fact, in 2008, we did not even experience high inflation, much less hyperinflation. As such, it is not credible to claim that hyperinflation in the U.S. will occur now or anytime in the immediate future.

That list has a number of countries people probably forgot went through hyperinflation, and some not all that long ago. Poland in 1990; Yugoslavia 1989; Latvia 1992, Argentina 1989... I wouldn't dismiss it as a third world phenomenon. I hasten to add that I do not claim it will occur - nobody has a reliable crystal ball, but neither do I think that This Time Is Different.

The author of that hyperinflation article wrote it in early February, saying he does not think hyperinflation is likely within the next two years. Okay, but have to wonder what he thinks today, or if he ever imagined the levels of debt that would be added so soon after barely a hiccup in economic activity, and whether he thinks that's the last pile of funny money that will be added.


(03-26-2020 03:57 PM)Caractacus Potts Wrote:  The book SlickyBoy has referred to is John T. Reed's "Hyperinflation and Depression." I bought it several years ago and am rereading it now. If you can 't buy foreign currencies and secret them away in banks in Canada and Switzerland the next best thing to do with rapidly depreciating currencies is to buy everything you will need for the rest of your life.

"What is that?" you wonder? Soap, deodorant, toothpaste, laundry detergent, toilet paper, paper towels, etc. Things you will use whether the Dow is at 3,000 or 30,000. Unfortunately the FED has made speculators of us all. According to the book Reed feels that the longest that things will drag out is two years. If you can make it that long in an uncertain environment you will probably be okay. I will post more after I have finished rereading the book.

CP

I think you'll find that book very useful. But I want to stress, he does not suggest secreting anything away. Reed goes out of his way to say you should report every foreign account over $10k or risk a huge fine and losing half of what's in the account. There's no legitimate danger of losing money in a foreign account in the event Uncle Sam's dollar goes tits up since the US would have no authority to claim such accounts. He also advises against keeping a stash of Swiss francs under your mattress, only because in that case the US may confiscate it if capital controls were brought into existence, unconstitutional as they might be.

I still think having a few non-hyperinflated notes around that everyone recognizes (CHF, CAD, AUS...) might not be a bad idea for bartering in a post-hyperinflation world. They're easier to carry around and negotiate with than slabs of silver or gold, but it's not as secure as a foreign account.

I disagree with him that you can realistically expect to buy and store every non-perishable thing you might need for the next two years, but his advice is generally sound.

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(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 06:08 PM by SlickyBoy.)
03-26-2020 05:54 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 05:54 PM)SlickyBoy Wrote:  
(03-26-2020 03:50 PM)Tail Gunner Wrote:  The fact is that hyperinflation is primarily a third-world problem.

http://www.munknee.com/21-countries-have...-u-s-next/

Hyperinflation has very specific pre-conditions in foreign currency obligations and a loss of tax revenue and productive resources. Printing money alone does not result in hyperinflation. In fact, in 2008, we did not even experience high inflation, much less hyperinflation. As such, it is not credible to claim that hyperinflation in the U.S. will occur now or anytime in the immediate future.

That list has a number of countries people probably forgot went through hyperinflation, and some not all that long ago. Poland in 1990; Yugoslavia 1989; Latvia 1992, Argentina 1989... I wouldn't dismiss it as a third world phenomenon. I hasten to add that I do not claim it will occur - nobody has a reliable crystal ball, but neither do I think that This Time Is Different.

The author of that hyperinflation article wrote it in early February, saying he does not think hyperinflation is likely within the next two years. Okay, but have to wonder what he thinks today, or if he ever imagined the levels of debt that would be added so soon after barely a hiccup in economic activity, and whether he thinks that's the last pile of funny money that will be added.

My bigger point was that hyperinflation does not often occur in first world nations, because of all the required prerequisites: massive money printing, foreign currency obligations, and a loss of tax revenue and productive resources.

Nor did I rely on that author for anything. I am relying on history and the lack of all the prerequisites for hyperinflation. I supplied the article just to show the chart that establishes that hyperinflation does not often occur in first world nations.

BTW: The term "Third World" is now often used interchangeably with "developing countries," which included Poland in 1990, Yugoslavia in 1989, Latvia 1992, and Argentina in 1989. At the very least, the FSU and former Warsaw Pact nations were second-world nation, not first-world nations.
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 06:10 PM by Tail Gunner.)
03-26-2020 06:06 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
Developing countries... that term nowadays is usually aspirational versus descriptive. But I get your point.

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03-26-2020 06:09 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
I would not want to hold over the weekend, the last two Mondays have been slaughters. Maybe it'll start early tomorrow. What I find with this virus is that people sit home and catch up on the news over the weekend, the virus moves fast through the population and they see new security steps get put in place on Monday.

I wouldn't want to hold on a Monday.

I would say the last few days = COMPLACENCY. People are denying the situation, Massive money is being printed, unemployment will sky rocket, or people will be paid to sit at home and do nothing. At the same time, no one is buying anything, we are all just hunkered down.

The consumer economy is down, all that is left is the real economy.

   

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03-26-2020 08:16 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
This is week old news, but it sums up the situation very concisely:

Quote:Bank of America's top U.S. economist on Thursday warned that the country is now in a recession in a note to investors.

CNBC reported that Michelle Meyer wrote in a letter to the company's clients that the U.S. economy is in a "deep plunge" brought on by the global coronavirus outbreak, which has sickened thousands across the country and more than 200,000 globally.

“We are officially declaring that the economy has fallen into a recession ... joining the rest of the world, and it is a deep plunge,” Meyer reportedly wrote. “Jobs will be lost, wealth will be destroyed and confidence depressed.”

https://thehill.com/policy/finance/48838...-recession
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 08:23 PM by Tail Gunner.)
03-26-2020 08:22 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 08:16 PM)NoMoreTO Wrote:  I would say the last few days = COMPLACENCY. People are denying the situation

Yes, it is even possible that the complacency of the COVID-19 deniers will sync with the complacency of the market deniers. If death rates suddenly surge, there could be a second shopping surge for toilet paper and other necessities (by those who did not stock up during the first surge) at the same time that there is a second surge of sellers in the markets at the end of a bull trap. I can envision people standing in checkout lines clutching their toilet paper as they frantically try to place stock trades from their smart phones.
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03-26-2020 08:29 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
Ok guys we can all breathe a sigh of relief, the crash is over Angel

03-26-2020 09:56 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
^An incredibly cold take from a supposedly serious publication.

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03-26-2020 10:35 PM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 09:56 PM)TrifeLife Wrote:  Ok guys we can all breathe a sigh of relief, the crash is over Angel


Could it be the antithetical harbinger of forty years ago? The media has an excellent track record of getting things exactly backwards.

   
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03-27-2020 12:21 AM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 09:56 PM)TrifeLife Wrote:  Ok guys we can all breathe a sigh of relief, the crash is over Angel




Heh....rude awakening will be coming. NYC is probably 2 weeks behind Italy which means we are going to see an incredible amount of cases around Easter which was Trump's timeline and he's not going to be able to hit that mark as the cases will be most likely 80,000 in NYC alone with deaths in total close to 9/11 which would be around 3,000. The rest of the country should fare better but the sheer size of the U.S. is going to make these numbers astronomical in total probably in the 175,000 to 200,000 range.

Market is going to react to this hard again.
03-27-2020 11:29 AM
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RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-27-2020 11:29 AM)The Wire Wrote:  
(03-26-2020 09:56 PM)TrifeLife Wrote:  Ok guys we can all breathe a sigh of relief, the crash is over Angel




Heh....rude awakening will be coming. NYC is probably 2 weeks behind Italy which means we are going to see an incredible amount of cases around Easter which was Trump's timeline and he's not going to be able to hit that mark as the cases will be most likely 80,000 in NYC alone with deaths in total close to 9/11 which would be around 3,000. The rest of the country should fare better but the sheer size of the U.S. is going to make these numbers astronomical in total probably in the 175,000 to 200,000 range.

Market is going to react to this hard again.

If today isn't a downer, what with the market down over 800+ points again, then things are not looking up but they are looking like a continued roller coaster.

The best time for the big players to make the most money is when the WHOLE country is panic buying/selling and making totally irrational decisions, especially with the stock market right now let alone in the other areas of their lives. Like one big con.
I pulled out in late January. My company sells and brokers a lot of orders with china for aircraft parts so we saw literally almost 2 months of no sales to them and we figured that was going to hit the USA pretty soon. It was plainly obvious. What's left is nothing but a shitshow I'm glad I'm not a part of that's for damn sure.

I doubt it. Remember that your lower level, millenial leftist isn't good at critical thinking. They're largely like trained dogs who emote in response to programmed cues like the word "racism" and "socialism". Easy_C

"The savage lives within himself while social man lives outside himself and can only live in the opinion of others, so that he seems to receive the feeling of his own existence only from the judgement of others concerning him."--Jean Jacques Rousseau
03-27-2020 11:37 AM
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Post: #421
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
I don't see how hyperinflation hits America before other major world economies. Already the dollar is surging despite record money printing, because other governments are even less fiscally responsible than America is. Japan's dept is 3x as high as America's, for example. China cooks the books and European debt has been defaulted on before, meaning people trust the Euro less than the dollar.

Maybe the Russian ruble won't be printed into oblivion? Their economy is weak though, not much else besides gas and oil there. Best assets are gold, silver, guns, ammo, and farm real estate in the worst case scenario's.

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03-27-2020 11:39 AM
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Post: #422
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-26-2020 08:16 PM)NoMoreTO Wrote:  The consumer economy is down, all that is left is the real economy.

Great point. Nobody I know is spending money at businesses that are already closed(deemed inessential).
But the businesses that keep the country running? Friends in a certain number of those industries are busier than ever.

1st world problem #3,517: "OMG I cant consoooom."

I doubt it. Remember that your lower level, millenial leftist isn't good at critical thinking. They're largely like trained dogs who emote in response to programmed cues like the word "racism" and "socialism". Easy_C

"The savage lives within himself while social man lives outside himself and can only live in the opinion of others, so that he seems to receive the feeling of his own existence only from the judgement of others concerning him."--Jean Jacques Rousseau
03-27-2020 11:51 AM
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Post: #423
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
I'm thinking we may see a rebound this afternoon, close in the green or near to it, short-sellers likely won't hold going into the weekend and long holders that haven't sold, won't - too deep underwater. My hope, my guess.
03-27-2020 11:58 AM
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Post: #424
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
(03-27-2020 11:39 AM)Samseau Wrote:  I don't see how hyperinflation hits America before other major world economies. Already the dollar is surging despite record money printing, because other governments are even less fiscally responsible than America is. Japan's dept is 3x as high as America's, for example. China cooks the books and European debt has been defaulted on before, meaning people trust the Euro less than the dollar.

Maybe the Russian ruble won't be printed into oblivion? Their economy is weak though, not much else besides gas and oil there. Best assets are gold, silver, guns, ammo, and farm real estate in the worst case scenario's.

Correct. That's why the yen, the yuan and the euro are expressly not on the list of recommended hedge currencies. But the ones Reed talks about in that book all come from countries more fiscally responsible (in terms of debt to GDP ratio) than America has been and continues to be.

Debt to GDP isn't the only measure of course. If you want the lowest ratio, Afghanistan is pretty near the bottom, but I'd hardly recommend buying any of their currency as a hedge.

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03-27-2020 02:05 PM
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Post: #425
RE: The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread
I sold my stocks but I can't stay away from markets (too addictive?). Now I decided to buy some put options just in case the markets go down. At least I know how much I can lose if I'm wrong. It's a bet I'm comfortable with. It's +40% in this exact moment (can go negative the next minute though).
(This post was last modified: 03-27-2020 02:52 PM by joost.)
03-27-2020 02:50 PM
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